2011 VA Voc Rehab Stipend Rates

VR&E Training Programs Subsistence Allowance Rate Increase

As of October 1, 2010

In some cases, a veteran requires additional education or training to become employable. A subsistence allowance is paid each month during training and is based on the rate of attendance (full-time or part-time), the number of dependents, and the type of training. The charts shown below reflect the rates as of October 1, 2010.

Based Upon 1.2% Consumer Price Index (CPI) Increase

Chapter 31 Subsistence Allowance Rates As of October 1, 2010


The following Subsistence Allowance rates are paid for training in an Institution of Higher Learning

Number of Dependents

Full Time Three Quarter Time One Half Time

No Dependents

$554.22 $416.43 $278.64
One Dependent $687.47 $516.35 $345.23
Two Dependents $810.13 $605.69 $405.81
Each Additional Dependent $59.05 $45.41 $30.30

Subsistence Allowance is paid for full time training only, in the following training programs:  Non-pay or nominal pay on-job training in a federal, state, local, or federally recognized Indian tribe agency; training in the home; vocational course in a rehabilitation facility or sheltered workshop; institutional non-farm cooperative.

Number of Dependents Full Time

No Dependents

$554.22
One Dependent $687.47
Two Dependents $810.13
Each Additional Dependent $59.05


The following rates are paid for Work Experience programs:
Non-pay or nominal pay work experience in a federal, state, local or federally recognized Indian tribe agency.

Number of Dependents

Full Time Three Quarter Time One Half Time

No Dependents

$554.22 $416.43 $278.64
One Dependent $687.47 $516.35 $345.23
Two Dependents $810.13 $605.69 $405.81
Each Additional Dependent $59.05 $45.41 $30.30

Subsistence Allowance is paid for full time training only in the following training programs:  Farm Cooperative, Apprenticeship, or other On-Job Training:

Number of Dependents Full Time
No Dependent $484.57
One Dependent $585.99
Two Dependents $675.36
Each Additional Dependent $43.93

Subsistence Allowance is paid at the following rates for combined training programs:  Combination of Institutional and On-Job Training (Full Time Rate Only):

Number of Dependents Institutional Greater than One Half On-the-Job Greater than One Half
No Dependent $554.22 $484.57
One Dependent $687.47 $585.99
Two Dependents $810.13 $675.36
Each Additional Dependent $59.05 $43.93

Subsistence Allowance is paid at the following rates for Non-farm Cooperative Training:  Non-farm Cooperative Institutional Training and Non-farm Cooperative On-Job Training – Full Time Rate Only:

Number of Dependents FT Non-Farm Coop/Institutional FT Non-Farm Coop/On-the-Job
No Dependent $554.22 $484.57
One Dependent $687.47 $585.99
Two Dependents $810.13 $675.36
Each Additional Dependent $59.05 $43.93


Subsistence Allowance is paid at the following rates for Independent Living programs: A subsistence allowance is paid each month during the period of enrollment in a rehabilitation facility when a veteran is pursuing an approved Independent Living Program plan.  Subsistence allowance paid during a period of Independent Living Services is based on rate of pursuit and number of dependents. Independent Living subsistence allowance rates:

Number of Dependents

Full Time Three Quarter Time One Half Time

No Dependents

$554.22 $416.43 $278.64
One Dependent $687.47 $516.35 $345.23
Two Dependents $810.13 $605.69 $405.81
Each Additional Dependent $59.05 $45.41 $30.30

Subsistence Allowance is paid at the following rates for Extended Evaluation programs: A subsistence allowance is paid each month during the period of enrollment in a rehabilitation facility when a veteran requires this service for the purpose of extended evaluation. Subsistence allowance during a period of extended evaluation is paid based on the rate of attendance and the number of dependents. Extended Evaluation program subsistence allowance rates:

Number of Dependents

Full Time Three Quarter Time One Half Time One Quarter Time

No Dependents

$554.22 $416.43 $278.64 $139.30
One Dependent $687.47 $516.35 $345.23 $172.63
Two Dependents $810.13 $605.69 $405.81 $202.90
Each Additional Dependent $59.05 $45.41 $30.30 $15.11

Voc Rehab Survival Guide Benjamin Krause is an award winning investigative reporter, Veterans Benefits Law attorney, and disabled veteran of the US Air Force, where he served in its Special Operations Command. He attended Northwestern University and  the University of Minnesota Law School using VA Vocational Rehabilitation.

While in law school, Benjamin won his decade-long fight for full disability benefits and now helps others do the same with this website and his guide, the Voc Rehab Survival Guide for Veterans. Since its first publication in 2011, the guide has helped the veteran community receive millions in untapped benefits through the VA Chapter 31 Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment program. 

Connect with Benjamin on  Google+,  Twitter,  Facebook and LinkedIn.

Comments

  1. Aharhel says

    Ok! here is the rates for half/full-time students, etc. But how I know I’m studding how much time. In my case, I’m in medicine school, I have 14 semester credits! The school says I’m half time student, but I understand it is full time what I am. My subsistence allowance falls more than the half, and my counselor says that it depends on the school. Can anybody tell me any thing about this, because I haven’t found much yet about it.

  2. Joe Castagna says

    Those of us who are Gulf War Veterans and have recently been certified with service connected disabilities have an opportunity which I am grateful for of using the Chapter 31 Program to finish out my Electrical Engineering Degree. This chance to nail it, get it done, and show them how it is done in the fleet, along with the real world is something that means more to me than most people would ever imagine.
    The catastrophic failure of this program along with the “Pre 9/11 GI Bill” are the monthly stipends of which you are to eat, pay bills, and continue to exist on no funds between semesters. This brings to mind the speculation of the “Bean counters” at the Department of Veteran Affairs who decide for whatever scientific wild idea to allow those (Based on my zip code) at the BAH E-5 Level with a dependent to receive $ 2175.00 per month. Then you take those on the Chapter 31 program who are handed $687.47 a month. I question my ability to complete the program successfully based off of maintaining the GPA in the 3.5 range and above while having to work during the semesters. But let’s go back to 1993 where the first semester out of the blocks from date of discharge going full time I was at a GPA 4.0. At that time the monthly amount received was around $530 which equated to a tank of gas per week with a sandwich per day from the cafeteria. At the end of the semester when I received the transcript I went to the Dean of Students who also sat next to me to observe me in class (As I had no idea who he was at that time other than an observer). I told the Dean “I busted my tail, did something I have never done before in my life by gaining a 4.0 GPA. Where is the scholarship?” He stated since the economy is in the can there is no money for scholarships but do not leave the university. I specifically stated that I have no ability to pay the bills since the job market is in the can and part time jobs do not exist. I must leave and go to work maybe attending school at night.
    19 years later I have the opportunity to return to school again on a full time basis, job market in the can, scholarships few and far between which I qualify for, again I bring the question “If there is no difference in academics between those on “Post 9/11 GI Bill” at the university level and those on “Chapter 31” at the university level, what is the goal here? What advantage does the Department of Veteran Affairs have with those who fall out of the Chapter 31 program as they cannot continue due their responsibilities? If there is absolutely no difference between the Veteran who just got out of the service a few months ago or a few years ago why is there such a financial gap for the cost of living as my zip code is my zip code? Granted you are not to get rich on these programs and that is understood however common sense would say just make the monthly allowances the same for all based on zip code and get it over with.
    A disability is a disability and it is nothing to be proud or ashamed of however it is a part of you that you will never have again. Which makes you no better nor worse than the person who is whole. What makes absolutely no sense here is that the number of other Veterans who I represent is so small that nothing will be done to correct this goat screw. Furthermore the pennies saved by the Department of Veteran Affairs for those of us who do drop out of these programs are not enough to justify the disproportionate value to begin with. As it pertains to other non university work training programs I would question the benefits of such a small stipend also since I have multiple training certificates that were performed in short time frames with academic loads that would make a PhD candidate whimper. So it is virtually impossible to say one program is more intense then another program. Maybe a state university against an Ivy League school has a difference in difficulty but no matter what anyone at anytime anywhere says you cannot dispute a zip code is a zip code and my cost of living is just as high as the Veteran sitting in class next to me.

  3. dwayne gore says

    yes i have started at itt last year march 14th i just recieves my disibility and was award assistance for the vocational rehab. they aer starting to pay me allowence starting this june. i wanted to know do i get back-pay from when i started last year?

  4. mathew materni says

    Is it true that most vets with the help of a service org. can get more than the typical 36 months of entitlement for either the ch 30 or ch 33 programs. I currently use the ch 31 benefit and no longer have ch 33 as an option, but if this is true then I am really going to feel as though I made a mistake going with the ch 31 program. It certainly has its benefits but for me I think the ch 33 benefit would have been the better option if you are eligible for additional months of benefits.

So what do you think?